Imagerie et cognition
Free Access
Issue
Med Sci (Paris)
Volume 27, Number 11, Novembre 2011
Imagerie et cognition
Page(s) 1000 - 1008
Section M/S Revues
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/medsci/201127111000
Published online 30 November 2011
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